Wednesday, 11 June 2008

My offering !

I never thought of attempting translating Rabindranath Tagore's songs !
He has been my source of inspiration, ever-enriching my thoughts, philosophy and ever more in realising my own existence in this beautiful world.
The following poem (song) belonged to the original "Gitanjali" written in January, 1908 ( the Bengali chosen collection of Tagore himself, not that won him the Nobel ) and for years together it has been the morning hymn that I (we) hear to welcome the day and the Sun !
My reader friends, be sure that it is a futile attempt to convey deep philosophy and devotion that the great poet expressed in his original contribution; still I felt to do so only to share even a fraction of it with my Non-bengali readers. In doing so, I tried to be as honest to convey the spirit, not the limited meaning of the words.......
It is my tribute to my eternal guardian, my conscience-keeper, the great poet and a greater human being, Rabindranath Tagore; I have nothing to lay before as my offering but to pick up only from amongst those in the tray that he once had offered before the ultimate self....
The Bengali version is :---
...............Nivrita praner debata
Jekhane jagen eka
Bhakta, sethay kholo dwar--
Aaj labo tar dekha ................
The transliteration follows :--
Where the Lord stays alone and awake
In a recluse corner of my soul;
O Devotee ! Unbolt the gate;
Let my eyes satiate in splendour of His presence !

I know not whom do I seek
Wandering all the day out and afar;
Only I overlooked to learn
How the evening sacrament is performed !

With the beams of thy radiant life
I let the candle of my life be lit;
O Priest ! Let me alone arrange
The tray of my offerings !

Where the meditative self pursues
An all-embracing piety of completeness;
O Lord ! Let me also touch and hold
A thin ray of thee lustrous spectrum !

7 comments:

  1. Rabindranath Tagore is a phenomenon and is much admired by non-Bengalis as well.

    Now, these are beautiful words that are full of meaning. Thank you for the transliteration that you presented here as a tribute to Tagore.:)

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  2. I love to read anything from tagore...
    more so if it is about gitanjali...
    Thank you for presenting another glimpse on tagore's poetry with your transliteration......
    how much i wish that i could read those original bengali verses...

    Hey! could you also tell it is which poem of the english edition of gitanjali...

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  3. @ Thanks, Celine, for your ever-encouraging words !
    Yes, Tagore is well-revered all over the world; my attempt was to present one of those finest poems (rather hymns--usually classified as Brahma sangeet ) for which no transliterated versions available (definitely so far my knowledge goes)....

    @ Thanks, Sidharth !
    I really expected to churn you up in your proposed recess on silence; yes, I was sure that Tagore's name will be enough to break the inertia...Ha Ha...
    It was not a part of the English version of "Songs Offerings"..so you will not find it there..
    It belonged to the Bengali collection of "Gitanjali".

    Best wishes for both of you, my friends !

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  4. you sure did :)
    well by the way silence looms only in my blog and not in my comments

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  5. Thanks, Sidharth !
    I love to read all you write...particularly, the sweet smell of its philosophic tone....
    Wish the recess ends soon in your blog too !

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  6. I came a circuitous route here ... thanks for your comment ... but your high standard of writing makes me an ignorant man.
    However, I am grateful to you and your efforts.
    I admire Rabindranath Tagore for another reason.
    For am too ignorant to understand poems.
    Mr Tagore returned the 'knighthood' given him by the Britishers, when he heard of the Machine Gunning of 1000s people in Calcutta by General Dyer.
    Heard of that incident? Sir.

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  7. In appreciating your thoughtful reflections on my feeble attempt to transliterate Tagore's hymn, I do also convey my heartfelt thanks for popping into my page.
    Poetry is also an illusive friend of mine; yet I love to run after her as for me chasing illusions is what life truly is. It offers only a journey that remains divine only in its deeds, in its pursuit and in its commitment. I love to dream about poetry with such a passion.

    I also feel great to be shared with your profound regards for Tagore. I know just a bit about his relinquishing Nighthood, but the particular incident of genocide happened in Jalianwalabag apart from numerous other similar incidents in Calcutta and all over India during the period under British rule.
    I feel great in reflecting myself to your kind comments too.
    With regards,

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